We recently were named in the Top 10% of inpatient rehabilitation facilities from among 870 facilities in the nation.
Here are our Top 10 reasons why we think this is good for our patients: 

10. Consistency.
This is our 3rd year of receiving this honor. Year after year, our care has been recognized as patient-centered, effective, efficient and timely.

9. The Proof is in the Pudding.
Our patients and their families can get a sense of reassurance knowing they are in good hands. We are passionate about patient care, and we strive every day to provide the highest level of care possible. It’s reassuring to know that our staff’s hard work and passion is paying off, especially when it’s recognized by an unbiased, third-party.

8. We’re Working with Our Peers to Make Things Better.
Not only for our patients, but for others around the nation. Through the UDSMR, our hospital collaborates with peers throughout the nation to share information and establish best practices for patients, helping to elevate rehabilitative care for everyone.

7. It Makes our Patients Feel Good.
When patients see that we’ve been ranked in the Top 10% in the nation, we hope it makes them feel good about being treated in our hospital.

6. More “Likes” on Facebook.
We know we’re not Justin Bieber or Taylor Swift, but we do love our fans; and we want them to love us. We like sharing good news and like it when others share it too. It always makes us feel good when we hear success stories, especially when those stories are of people being treated here in our community.

5. We get to have a party!
We’re going to celebrate this accomplishment with our patients and friends. We’re looking forward to camaraderie, music, and yummy food – and will probably eat way too much dessert. If we’re lucky, we might even get to see our CEO bust a move on the dance floor.

4. More Publicity, More Community Awareness.
We have a great work family here at the hospital, as our patients can attest. Our patients see our staff’s passion for rehabilitative care every day. As our reputation for excellent patient care continues to grow, the potential for more of our community to learn about our services grows, as well.

3. It Raises the Bar.
We’re like the Michael Phelps of rehabilitative care – top of our game. But there’s always room for improvement. Plus, we like a little challenge, especially if it means greater health care results for our patients.

2. It Brings our Community a Sense of Pride.
In the iconic lyrics of Lee Greenwood, “I’m proud to be an American.” And on behalf of our entire staff, we are proud to be part of some of the top performing rehabilitation facilities in the nation. Those in our community are able to receive some of the highest level of patient care right here in their backyard.

AND THE NUMBER ONE REASON…
1. It Matters!
We’re serious about our commitment to our patients to provide them with the highest level of rehabilitative care available. It matters. To us. To our patients. To our community.

Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital has been named in the Top 10 percent of inpatient rehabilitation facilities in the United States. The hospital’s care was cited as being as being patient-centered, effective, efficient and timely.

“We strive to deliver this higher level of care as our standard,” says Nicholas Nilest, CEO of Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital. “We have graciously been recognized as a top performing facility for three years now, but we never take it for granted. Our staff is exceptionally passionate about helping patients reach their full potential through the care we provide. We work daily to ensure patients are reaching their highest levels of ability and independence.”

Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital was ranked in the Top 10 percent from among 870 inpatient rehabilitation facilities nationwide by the Uniform Data System for Medical Rehabilitation (UDSMR), a non-profit corporation that was developed with support from the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research. The UDSMR maintains the world’s largest database of rehabilitation outcomes.

“If you take into account that a national study has previously shown that inpatient rehabilitation facilities provide better long-term results for patients, being ranked at the top of that group validates the quality of care we provide,” says Dr. Michael Fuentes, Medical Director of Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital, referencing a study commissioned by the ARA Research Institute that showed patients treated in inpatient facilities experienced improved quality of life as compared to skilled nursing facilities.

“To provide the highest level of rehabilitative care available in the United States to our own community is truly rewarding,” Fuentes says. “This means our family, friends, and colleagues don’t need to leave the area to receive the best care available.”

Through the UDSMR, Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital also will collaborate with peers throughout the nation to share information and establish best practices for patients. “This helps elevate rehabilitative care for everyone across the United States,” Fuentes says.

Corpus Christi Rehabilitation Hospital provides specialized rehabilitative services to patients who are recovering from or living with disabilities caused by injuries, illnesses, or chronic medical conditions. This includes, but is not limited to, strokes, brain injuries, spinal cord injuries, orthopedic injuries, cerebral palsy, ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease), multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease.

Any bump or blow to the head has concussion potential. Concussion symptoms may occur immediately or days/weeks later and can include:

  • Headache
  • Concentration or memory issues
  • Nausea
  • Change in sleep habits
  • Dizziness
  • Feeling sluggish/”foggy”
  • Blurred vision
  • Light sensitivity

If you suspect someone may be experiencing a concussion after a blow to the head, ask these questions immediately then again a few minutes later. If the individual doesn’t know the answers or seems confused, consult a healthcare professional immediately.

  • What day is it?
  • What month is it?
  • Repeat these words: Girl, dog, green (ask to repeat again a few minutes later)
  • Repeat the days of the week backward

Bike riding is one of America’s favorite past times, especially for children. But every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 26,000 bicycle-related injuries to children and adolescents result in traumatic brain injuries.

A brain injury in a child can have more of a harmful impact because a child’s brain is continuously undergoing development. An injury can alter, or even halt, certain developments of the brain.

The good news is that there are several easy ways to help prevent brain injuries while your child is riding a bike:

  1. Properly Fitted Helmet – wearing a properly fitted helmet every time you and your child ride a bike is the main way to prevent brain injury.
  2. Follow the Rules of the Road – by teaching your child to go with the flow of traffic on the right-side of the road, what hand signals to use and when, and what the different traffic signs and signals mean can help your child stay safe.
  3. Reflectors – attach a front headlight and a rear red reflector to your child’s bike. If your child is riding beyond daylight hours, have him or her wear reflective clothing, as well.

Be a role-model to your child. Go biking as a family and practice biking skills and safety together. Wear your properly fitted helmet, follow the rules of the road, and attach reflectors to your own bike so that your child can witness biking safety first-hand. By using these safety precautions, you can help prevent brain injuries in not only your child, but yourself, as well.

New guidelines released this past fall by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association have changed the way you should be looking at your blood pressure numbers. High blood pressure is now defined as 130/80 and higher, which differs from the older definition of high blood pressure as 140/90 or higher.

But what exactly is blood pressure, and what do these numbers mean?

Blood pressure is the pressure your blood puts on the walls of blood vessels as it circulates through your body. High blood pressure is when the force of the circulating blood is consistently too high, putting individuals at risk for health issues such as strokes, heart attacks, and heart failure among other conditions.

When an individual has his or her blood pressure taken, two numbers are given – a top number and a bottom number (i.e. 120/80). The top number represents the systolic number, which indicates how much pressure the blood is exerting against the artery walls as the heart beats. The bottom number represents diastolic pressure, or how much pressure the blood is exerting on the artery walls in between the heart beats when the heart is at rest.

According to the American Heart Association, ideal blood pressure is less than 120/80.

High blood pressure doesn’t usually have any signs or symptoms, so having your blood pressure tested by a healthcare professional and knowing your numbers is the best way to protect yourself. While it can’t be cured, high blood pressure can be managed through lifestyle changes and even medication when necessary. Be sure to discuss your blood pressure with your physician.

According to Strava, a social network for athletes, most people by now have given up on their New Year’s resolutions (“Quitters’ Day” was officially Jan. 12). For those whose healthy resolutions may have fallen victim to that day, here is something to consider: According to the American Heart Association, moderate-intensity exercise is important in preventing heart disease and stroke, which are the nation’s No. 1 and No. 5 killers, respectively.

So, how do you gauge if your exercise is at the “moderate” level?

First, pay attention to how hard you think your body is working (this is called perceived exertion). Take note of how heavy you’re breathing, how much you’re sweating, and how tired your muscles feel. Studies have shown that an individual’s perceived exertion correlates to his or her heart rate. This means that if you feel like you’re working hard, your heart rate is probably higher.

You can estimate if you’re reaching the moderate-intensity level of an activity by using perceived exertion. In general, on a scale of 1-20, a moderate-intensity activity would feel like an 11-14.
Other clues of this level of exercise include:

  • Breaking a light sweat at about 10 minutes into the exercise
  • Quickened breathing, but you’re not out of breath
  • Being able to carry on a conversation while performing the activity

Moderate-intensity exercises can include brisk walking, biking, pushing a lawn mower, water aerobics, doubles tennis, gardening, and ballroom dancing, among other activities. So, take your pick!