All Posts Tagged: Healthy Habits

Advantages of Adding Walking to Your Routine

With the temperatures beginning to rise slowly, and the sun showing its face for longer each day, there couldn’t be a better time to start a new exercise plan.

This doesn’t mean that you have to begin a rigorous weight-lifting regimen or start training for a marathon; it simply means that you’ve got more opportunities to get your body moving and breathe in some revitalizing fresh air.

One of the best ways to get active without causing too much stress or taking a large chunk of time out of your day is to go for a walk. The benefits of walking extend far beyond weight loss, and can contribute to significantly raising your quality of life.

Lift your mood.

Going for a walk, especially outside, is a great way to boost your spirits. Once you step out your front door, you’re improving your quality of life… even before you start your walk. The energizing effects of clean, fresh air coupled with the Vitamin D boost that comes from being out in the sunlight have been known to have revitalizing results.

Endorphins, the pain-blocking hormones that can sometimes produce a euphoric effect, are also released during exercise, making walking a low-impact way to experience those “feel good” chemicals.

Burn calories.

If weight loss is your goal, walking (in addition to healthy diet changes) is a fantastic way to burn calories and work toward the recommended 150 minutes of moderate exercise per week. The amount of calories you burn will depend on your weight and speed, but the general rule of thumb states that a 160-pound adult is likely to burn 100 calories per mile.

Improve your overall health.

When it comes to exercise, there are, of course, more strenuous options than others. Fitness classes, jogging, and weightlifting, while different, all have at least one important thing in common: the benefit of movement.

When you get your body moving on a regular basis, you get to enjoy the benefits of better circulation, strengthened bones, and improved balance and coordination. This movement also supports the prevention and management of certain diseases like heart disease, type 2 diabetes, and high blood pressure.

Socialize while you exercise.

Because walking is an exercise that can be done at your own pace, it has the potential to be a fun social activity as well as a way to improve your health. Try getting a group of friends together a few times a week for walking; you’ll be able to catch up with each other and get your body moving, all at the same time. An additional benefit to walking with other people is the accountability factor: there’s a better chance that you’ll stick to your exercise plan if you have others depending on you. Boosting your energy levels, mood, and social life? That’s definitely an exercise win/win.

As always…

Walking is typically a very low-impact exercise option for those who are just beginning in the world of exercise or who have physical restrictions that keep them from other activities. This doesn’t mean, however, that a walking regimen is right for everyone. If you have concerns or questions about the way a walking plan can benefit or affect your life, please talk to your doctor. Together, you’ll be able to come up with a plan that gets you moving and directs you toward better health.

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Taking Steps to a Calming Routine

Patients from all walks of life come through the doors of CCRH, and we get the extreme privilege of experiencing their varying personalities, hopes, fears, and knowledge. While the differences are always distinct, we have noticed that there is at least one factor that is common among the lot: stress.

Whether the stress is minor or extreme, it’s a feeling we see written on the faces of team members and patients alike. Last week we talked about Healthy Ways to Handle Your Stress, and one of our tips was creating a calming routine. The following tips can be incorporated into anyone’s routine, and may help relieve a stressful schedule.

Nourish Your Body

“Stress-eating” is a term that gets heard more and more these days, and is a sneaky pitfall when it comes to taking care of yourself. A recent study by food scientists at Cornell University has shown that, when experiencing a period of negative emotion, pleasurable foods become even more appealing than usual, and unappealing foods become exponentially more distasteful.

This information makes it even more important to adopt a healthy diet. By planning ahead and making nourishing foods easily accessible, you’ll be better prepared for those times when you’ve had a rough morning, and a box of doughnuts shows up in the hospitality room. The simple act of eating a satisfying, nutrient-packed breakfast can set the atmosphere of your whole day, removing the need to reach for an unhealthy snack.

Making an impulse-eating decision can often cause guilt or physical discomfort later on—which will only further contribute to your stress levels.

Go for a Walk

One of the best ways to ease your mind is to get moving. Exercise triggers the production of endorphins, which are the neurotransmitters in your brain associated with “feeling good.” By focusing your mind on the movement of your body, you’ll be able to give yourself a break from your worries, creating a small, meditative escape from stress. Walking, specifically, is an ideal form of stress relief, as it is more accessible to people of differing athletic abilities. In addition to endorphin production, regular exercise promotes better health and self-esteem, which can drastically decrease stress levels.

Any exercise is an effective way to cope with stress, but it seems to be especially so when it is taken outdoors. Being able to remove yourself from your typical environment and take a few moments to connect with the outside world can be a good way to hit the reset button.

Talk to Someone

Stress can be very overwhelming when faced alone. Finding a close friend, support group, or therapist to share your feelings and fears with can help put your stress in perspective. Whether it’s the very basic act of hearing your feelings out loud or the relief of discovering that you’re not alone, finding a person or group to talk to is a powerful way to bring about some emotional relief.

Find a Healthy Distraction

While analyzing your stress is important and helpful, it’s equally important to give your mind a break. When feelings of anxiety and burden become too overwhelming, a brief, pleasurable escape can allow your body and mind to relax.

In addition to exercise, there are many ways to do this. Finding a new book to read or carving out some time to listen to your favorite music can help release some more of those endorphins and better prepare you to tackle your stress later on.

Be careful, however, to avoid distractions that are harmful, such as drugs, alcohol, or stress-eating. These are deceptive escapes that ultimately result in more stress for you.

Just Breathe

A tried-and-true method of stress relief and relaxation is the practice of deep breathing. While causing extreme emotional strain, stress can also affect a person physically. Practicing deep breathing exercises can help reverse some of the effects that stress has on the body by relaxing your heartbeat, increasing oxygen to your brain, and even lowering your blood pressure. We encourage you to visit this link for a fantastic resource on deep breathing information and exercises.

Cross Things off Your List

While all of the above activities can help reduce your stress, sometimes the only way to find relief is to remove your stressors. Make a list of factors that you can change, control, or accomplish, such as necessary duties and overwhelming tasks that need to be finished. You’ll find your relief grow dramatically as you remove these stressful items from your list, allowing more room for the things that bring you happiness.

Those on the team here at CCRH are no strangers to stress. We want to provide a source of comfort and knowledge so that our patients and their families receive the best possible care. Adding just one of these tips to your everyday routine may seem like too small a task to make a difference, but being more aware of being stressed helps you make a step in the right direction.

Sources:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/07/150709093313.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/exercise-and-stress/art-20044469

http://www.healthywomen.org/content/article/reduce-stress-journaling

 

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